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ICL: RELIGIONS: THE PROBLEM OF “SIMILAR ORIGINS” AND “CONTEMPORARY SCHISMS”

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Name: ICL: RELIGIONS: THE PROBLEM OF “SIMILAR ORIGINS” AND “CONTEMPORARY SCHISMS”
Date: July 9, 2018
Time: 10:10 AM - 12:10 PM EDT
Event Description:
RELIGIONS: THE PROBLEM OF “SIMILAR ORIGINS” AND “CONTEMPORARY SCHISMS”
 
Dr. Eric Dickman, 5 Sessions, Monday, July 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 10:10 am – 12:10 pm, Cost:  $18
 
Many people see deep similarities between religions. They all seem to teach compassion, or that there is a deeper meaning to life, or that they all point back to the same ultimate or divine source. This thought is so prevalent that some early scholars of religion conceived of religions as if in an evolutionary paradigm—where originally natural religions evolved into legalistic religions, which evolved into the consummate religion (you guessed it, “Christianity”!). Today, critical scholars recognize this prejudice in early scholarship as “orientalist,” that is, a perspective that gives privilege to Christianity and Western society over others that they deem as “primitive” or less evolved. In this course, we will look at ways people have sought to identify fundamental historical or spiritual origins of “the religious impulse,” and how that sets us up to be surprised by all the contemporary diverse religions and sectarianism and schisms. How might we explain the “origin” of religion? How can we explain the contemporary surplus of religious sects and schisms? Why are there so many different religions? Why are there so many versions of even the same religion? We will consider these questions and more.
 
Dr. Nathan Eric Dickman is the Associate Professor of Philosophy and Religious Studies, and Chair of the Religion and Philosophy Department. Dr. Dickman’s teaching and research interests are in philosophical hermeneutics, philosophy of religions, philosophy of language, and comparative questions in religious studies. He has taught courses in Critical Thinking, Medieval Philosophical Theology, Existentialism, Islam, Philosophy of Language, Buddhist thought, and more. He has published many peer-reviewed articles and presented at countless conferences, and he strives to help his students do the same. His work extends beyond the fields of philosophy and religion, with published work on the use of questions in the college classroom and in question games such as "20 Questions." Dr. Dickman loves to talk about "deep" things like the meaning of life, the being of God, myths and symbols, and religious diversity. You're welcome to stop by and chat with him at his office or wherever you might run into him around campus. Or you might try catching up with him during meetings of the student groups S.I.G.H.T. (Student Inquiry Group for Humanist Thought) or the Buddhist Meditation and Mindfulness Gathering (BMMG). Dr. Dickman earned bachelor of arts degrees in both philosophy and religion from the University of Dubuque and earned a Ph.D. in re7ligious studies, specializing in modern religious philosophy from The University of Iowa.
Location:
ICL Classroom at Young Harris College.
 
Date/Time Information:
Monday, July 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 10:10 am – 12:10 pm
Contact Information:
For more information please visit www.iclyhc.org for registration and detailed course information or call 706.379.5194 and leave a message or send an email to icl@yhc.edu.
Fees/Admission:
Course fee $18. (Requires ICL membership - $25 annually).
 
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